Kate Nota and J/111 Odyssey Team

Win the

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Video Contest

NEWPORT, R.I. (September 39, 2014) – Kate Nota and her team onboard J/111 Odyssey won the Ripple Effect Short Video Contest, which was part of the 10th Anniversary of the Ida Lewis Distance Race this summer. The contest was introduced to the popular overnighter this year and intended to engage Youth Sailors (aged 14-20) by asking them the question “What do you like most about offshore/overnight sailing?” through a video essay or documentary no longer than five minutes in length.

Kate Nota and the team odyssey had won the short video contest, which is one of the programs of Ida distance race by Lewis in the month of August. Details of this contest will be available online and click here to read to about it. The intention of this programme is to engage the youth sailors.

Video YouTube Link:http://youtu.be/qdd8wnhP3so

 

Video Embed Code: <iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/qdd8wnhP3so” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

Meghan Sepe’s Photos available for purchase

2014 ILDR Trophies with Photos

Kattack Tracker

Video and Photo Contests

 

Ripple Effect Short Video Contest

 

 

 

 

 

News Releases

September 30,2014

Kate Nota and J/111 Odyssey Team Wint the ILDR Video Contest

August 17, 2014

High Winds and Rough Seas Challenge Competitors in Overnight Race

August 12, 2014

ILDR uses “Virtual Mark”

July 30, 2014

Get Your (Distance) Game On

June 2014

Top Ten Reasons Why You Should Race

March 2014

ILDR Celebrates10th Anniversary…

Read More…

 

 

Sponsors

Starting Line Sponsors

New England Boatworks

City of Newport

Helly Hansen

Marsh

Newport Shipyard

North Sails

Contributing Sponsors

DYT Yacht Transport

Flint Audio Video

Goslings Rum

Mac Designs

Sea Gear Uniforms

Rig Pro Southern Spars

Stella Artois

Toni Mills Graphic Design

 

 

 

 

 

 

High Winds and Rough Seas Challenge Competitors in Overnight Race

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 17, 2014) – Mother Nature packed an extra punch for the 10th Anniversary of the Ida Lewis Distance Race, with high winds (up to 25 knots) and rough seas challenging its record 47-boat fleet and forcing 12 to retire from racing. Nevertheless, the popular overnighter, which started Friday (August 15) at 12:30 p.m. off Fort Adams in Newport, R.I., delivered lots of fun summer memories for its IRC, PHRF, Doublehanded and Multihull competitors (all racing on the 150 nautical mile “Block Island” course), including Steve Benjamin’s Carkeek HP 40 Spookie, which won IRC and claimed line honors after crossing the finish line at 8:42 a.m. on Saturday (August 16).

 

Read more…

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Uses “Virtual Mark”

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 12, 2014) – A “virtual mark” adds an intriguing new twist to the 10th Annual Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR), which starts this Friday (August 15). Starting at 12:30 p.m. off Fort Adams in Newport, R.I., the popular overnighter takes its fleet of PHRF, IRC, One-Design, Doublehanded and Multihull boats on one of four courses – between 104nm and 177nm – that trace the New England coastline.

 

Read More…

 

 

The PHRF Class start at the 2013 Ida Lewis Distance Race (Photo Credit Meghan Sepe)

Click photo to download in high resolution

 

Get Your (Distance) Game On

Early Entry Deadline Fast Approaching

 

NEWPORT, R.I. (July 30, 2014) – Next month, the Ida Lewis Distance Race will celebrate a decade of offshore fun with its 10th edition of the popular overnighter that starts and finishes in Newport, R.I. At 12:30 p.m. on Friday, August 15, PHRF, IRC, One-Design, Doublehanded and Multihull boats will start off Fort Adams to embark on one of four coastal courses – between 104nm and 177nm, depending on weather and final classes – that follow New England’s alluring coastline and incorporate iconic landmarks such as Block Island, Montauk Point and Martha’s Vineyard. (To receive $50 off registration, competitors are encouraged to sign up by the early entry deadline of Friday, August 1.)

 

Read More…

 

 

The IRC Class start at the 2013 Ida Lewis Distance Race (Photo Credit Meghan Sepe)

Click photo to download in high resolution

 

Tenth Anniversary ILDR

Top Ten Reasons Why You Should Race

NEWPORT, R.I. (June 11, 2014) – Ida Lewis Yacht Club’s signature overnight competition, the Ida Lewis Distance Race celebrates its 10th Anniversary in 2014. And to toast a decade of offshore fun for everyone, here are the top ten reasons why you should be on the starting line when the race begins off Newport, R.I., on Friday, August 15th.

 

 

Read More…

 

Join Grand Prix Racers & Cruising Sailors for the 10th ANNUAL Ida Lewis Distance Race

Friday, August 15, 2014

Newport, Rhode Island

 

 

Photo by Meghan Sepe

Featuring four coastal race courses between 104 nm and 177 nm, the Ida Lewis Distance Race is the perfectly designed overnighter for IRC, PHRF, One Design, Multihull and Double-Handed boats of 28 feet or longer. Its round-trip course starts and finishes off the historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club and includes turning marks at Castle Hill, Brenton Reef, Block Island, Montauk Point, Martha’s Vineyard and Buzzards Tower.

 

 

Both grand prix racers and cruising sailors have come to love and embrace this August tradition, which also offers special trophies for a Youth Challenge and Collegiate Challenge. The tenth edition of the Ida Lewis Distance Race is scheduled for Friday, August 15, 2014.

 

 

It is a qualifier for the New England Lighthouse Series (PHRF); the Northern and Double-Handed Ocean Racing Trophies (IRC); and the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series.

 

 

Competitors are invited to enjoy the Awards Ceremony and dinner with their family and friends on the deck of Ida Lewis Yacht Club Saturday evening.

2014 Ida Lewis Distance Race

Place, Yacht Name, Type, Skipper/Crew, Hometown, Results, Total Points

IRC (IRC – 14 Boats)

The distance race is one of the continuous running for at least three kilometers. For this running, you should be physiologically strong as well as mentally strong. When i was reading this hypothesis, it suggested that running habit in human is due to the travelling, scavenging and hunting.Long distance running will make you fit and active.

  1. SPOOKIE, Carkeek HP 40, Steve & Heidi Benjamin , Norwalk, Conn., USA – 1 (1)
  2. Barleycorn, Swan 42, Brendan Brownyard , Bay Shore, N.Y., USA – 2 (2)
  3. Settler , NEB Tripp 43, Thomas Rich , Portsmouth, R.I., USA – 3 (3)

PHRF (PHRF – 13 Boats)

  1. Samba, Quest 30, Tristan Mouligne , Boston, Mass., USA – 1 (1)
  2. Crazy Horse – Collegiate, Sloop 50, Kevin McLaughlin-Duquesne Univ., Fairhaven, Mass., USA–2 (2)
  3. Vamoose, J/120, Bob Manchester , Barrington, R.I., USA – 3 (3)

PHRF – Doublehanded (PHRF – 6 Boats)

 

  1. Pleiad Racing, Class 40, Edward Cesare , Norwalk, Conn., USA – 1 (1)

 

  1. GryphonSolo2, Class 40, Joe Harris , S. Hamilton, Mass., USA – 2 (2)

 

  1. Toothface2, Class 40, Michael Dreese , West Newton, Mass., USA – 3 (3)

 

 

 

PHRF – Cruising Spinnaker (PHRF – 7 Boats)

 

  1. Duck Soup, C&C 37 R/XL, Bill Clavin , Warwick, R.I., USA – 1 (1)

 

  1. Spirit, J 92S, EC Helme , Newport, R.I., USA – 2 (2)

 

  1. URSA, J/109, Brooke Mastrorio , Lakeville, Mass., USA – 3 (3)

 

 

 

Multihull (ToT – 6 Boats)

 

  1. Bazinga!, F-31, Dave Lussier , Exeter, R.I., USA – 1 (1)

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race Commodore’s Trophy

 

Awarded annually for best corrected time in the Ida Lewis Distance Race in the IRC Division.

 

First Overall IRC Division.

 

 

 

USA 95 Spookie  Steve & Heidi Benjamin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ida Lewis Distance Race Russell L. Hoyt

 

Memorial Trophy

 

Awarded annually for best elapsed time in the Ida Lewis Distance Race in the IRC Division

 

USA 95 Spookie  Steve & Heidi Benjamin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ida Lewis Distance Race Lime Rock Trophy

 

Awarded annually for best corrected time in the Ida Lewis Distance Race in the PHRF Division.

 

First overall PHRF Division

 

 

 

USA 301 Samba Tristan Mouligne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ida Lewis Distance Race Lois J. Muessel Trophy

 

Awarded annually for best elapsed time in the Ida Lewis Distance Race in the PHRF Division

 

USA 43777 Crazy Horse Kevin McLauglin

 

 

 

 

 

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Ida Lewis Distance Race Double Handed Trophy

 

Awarded annually for best corrected time in the   Ida Lewis Distance Race in the Double Handed Division

 

USA 39 Pleiad Racing  Edward Cesare

 

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Ida Lewis Distance Race Multihull Trophy

 

Awarded annually for best corrected time in the   Ida Lewis Distance Race in the Double Handed Division

 

 

 

 

 

USA 190 Bazinga!  Dave Lussier

 

 

 

—————————————————————————————————–

 

Ida Lewis Distance RaceArent H. Kits van Heyningen Trophy

 

Awarded annually for winner in the Ida Lewis Distance Race Youth Challenge(PHRF)

 

USA 711 Odyssey  Alfred Van Liew

 

 

 

 

 

—————————————————————————————————–

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race William E. Tuthill Memorial Trophy

 

Awarded annually for winner in the Ida Lewis Distance Race Colegeiate (PHRF)

 

USA 43777 Crazy Horse  Kevin McLaughlin- Duquesne Univ.

 

 

 

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Ida Lewis Distance Race Multihull Division

 

USA 190  Bazinga!  F-31   Dave Lussier

 

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Ida Lewis Distance RaceNavigator Award

 

USA 301 Samba Tristan Mouligne

 

 

 

—————————————————————————————————–

 

Ida Lewis Distance RaceHelly Hanson Award

 

USA 95 Spookie  Steve & Heidi Benjamin

 

 

 

Race Courses

 

Please SEE NOR or updated release for most updated Course Description

FOR Reference ONLY – COURSE 1- The Montauk Course
Start East Passage Narragansett Bay, south of Rose Island
R”2″ QR Whistle, Brenton Reef to port
RW”SR”MoA Whistle, south of Sachuest Point to starboard
RW”MP” MoA WHIS, Montauk Point to port
R”2″ Fl R 4 sec WHIS, No Man’s Land to port
Buzzards Bay Tower Fl 2.5 sec Horn to port
RW”MP” MoA WHIS, Montauk Point to starboard
Finish off Ida Lewis Yacht Club Distance 177nm

Before you select a particular sailing course, ensure that you look in for the following points so that strike the best deal:

  1. Check the prerequisites of the course. Most courses stipulate the minimum and maximum age limit.  Even the basic courses mandate knowledge of swimming, orientation and grounding sills.
  2. A good basic course should cover Terminologies related to sailing, safety tips, efficient boat handling techniques, sail trim, rudimentary navigation, knots and lessons on basic weather. Click this site to know more details.
  3. One basic skill is pruned, you can opt for advanced courses which cover more specific sail trim, helming and complex maneuvers. Check the below courses too.
FOR Reference ONLY – COURSE 2- The Block Island Course
Start East Passage Narragansett Bay, south of Rose Island
R”2″ QR Whistle, Brenton Reef to port
RW”SR”MoA Whistle, south of Sachuest Point to starboard
RW”MP” MoA WHIS, Montauk Point to port
R”2″ Fl R 4 sec WHIS, No Man’s Land to port
Buzzards Bay Tower Fl 2.5 sec Horn to port
RW”A” MoA WHIS, SE of Block Island to starboard
Finish off Ida Lewis Yacht Club Distance 150nm

 

FOR Reference ONLY – COURSE 3 – Nomans Course
Start East Passage Narragansett Bay, south of Rose Island
R”2″ QR Whistle, Brenton Reef to port
RW”SR”MoA Whistle, south of Sachuest Point to starboard
RW”MP” MoA WHIS, Montauk Point to port
R”2″ Fl R 4 sec WHIS, No Man’s Land to port
Buzzards Bay Tower Fl 2.5 sec Horn to port
R“2” QR Whistle, Brenton Reef to starboard
Finish off Ida Lewis Yacht Club Distance 122nm
Nomans Course

 

FOR Reference ONLY – COURSE 4- Buzzards Bay Tower Course
Start East Passage Narragansett Bay, south of Rose Island
R”2″ QR Whistle, Brenton Reef to port
RW”SR”MoA Whistle, south of Sachuest Point to starboard
RW”MP” MoA WHIS, Montauk Point to port
“Buzzards Bay Tower” Fl 2.5 sec Horn to port
R“2” QR Whistle, Brenton Reef to starboard
Finish off Ida Lewis Yacht Club Distance 104nm

 

Catapult Goes the Distance

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Catapult Goes the Distance

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 19, 2012) – Ideal sailing conditions, perfect starts and a 16-18 knot southwesterly breeze allowed the 26 boats competing in the 2012 Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR) to power up on Friday, August 17, and provide a great show for the spectators who turned out to see them off on their offshore adventure.  The IRC, PHRF and PHRF Doublehanded fleets were sent on the 122 nautical mile Nomans course, while the two boats racing in the PHRF Cruising Spinnaker class took on the 103 nautical mile Buzzards Tower course.

Weather conditions led to a prediction that the leaders in IRC would be at the finish line off the historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club sometime after sunrise on Saturday morning, where they would receive the traditional champagne welcome.  Not always the sailing team strikes luck like this occasion.  You would be surprised to learn the experiences of sailors who started under favorable weather conditions.  Yet during the sail, they would have faced unimagined challenges.  Sometimes the weather might look unfavorable.  A team would still win the race.  Check this web site for such incidents.  Let us see what happened to the IRC team. That prophecy came true for the Ker 40 Catapult owned by Marc Glimcher (New York, N.Y.), which had passed the first mark of the course with about a minute lead on the rest of the IRC fleet and held on to take line honors just before 6:30 a.m. on Saturday morning.

Read more…

Kattack – Live Feed

News Releases

August 19, 2012

 

 

August 17, 2012

 

Off to an awesome start…

 

August 16, 2012

 

Offshore Adventure Beckons

 

July 2012

 

Roster Grows with Familiar Names and New Entries

 

Photo by Onne van der Wal

 

May 2012

 

Offshore Racing For All Ages

 

Onne van der Wal photo

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Off to an awesome start…

 

 

 

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 17, 2012) – The following are the courses for the various classes:

 

 

 

Class

Division

Course

1

 

IRC

 

C – Nomans-Approx. 122 nm

 

2

 

PHRF

 

C – Nomans-Approx. 122 nm

 

3

 

PHRF Doublehanded

 

C – Nomans-Approx. 122 nm

 

4

 

PHRF Cruising Spinnaker

 

D – Buzzards Bay Tower-Approx. 104 nm

 

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

CONTACT:  Jan Harley, Media Pro, 401-849-0220

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Offshore Adventure Beckons

 

 

 

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 16, 2012) – The historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club was a beehive of activity today as competitors readied for the eighth edition of the Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR) which is set to get underway at 1:00 p.m. on Friday, August 17.  Three starts will dispatch approximately 26 boats ranging from 30-56’ on an overnight adventure that will potentially cover between 104 and 177 nautical miles.  The course, which may be different for each class and which will be determined shortly before the race starts, will take the competitors out of Narragansett Bay before bringing them back for the ILDR’s signature champagne finish between Ida Lewis Yacht Club and the southern tip of Goat Island.

 

Jamestown Yacht Club member Edmund Flynn (Marlboro, Mass.) was enthusiastic about making his fifth consecutive run in the ILDR.  He will sail the Beneteau 40.7 Lark with Tim Brownell (Wickford, R.I.) in the doublehanded class in which he took third place last year. “We’d like to be competitive and we’d like to win the race,” said Flynn. “We go out there to have fun. It’s really great because you have the mix; you’ve got the current, you’re in different breeze at different times and you have this strategic challenge towards the end where you have to decide which side to go around Block Island.”

 

Read Full Release…

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race 2012

Friday, August 17, 2012, Newport, RI

Save the DATE!

 

The 2012 edition of the Ida Lewis Distance Race will send competitors on a choice of four coastal race courses (with distances of 104 to 177 nautical miles) that cover some of the most storied and beautiful sailing grounds in the world. With a spectacular start off Fort Adams in Narragansett Bay, the race includes turning marks at Castle Hill, Brenton Reef, Block Island, Montauk Point, Martha’s Vineyard and Buzzards Tower on its way to a signature champagne finish inside Newport Harbor off the historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club.

 

The race’s eighth edition is scheduled for Friday, August 17, 2012, with classes for IRC, PHRF (including Cruising Spinnaker and a Youth Challenge division), One Design and Double-Handed boats of 28 feet or longer. It is a qualifier for the New England Lighthouse Series (PHRF); the Northern and Double-Handed Ocean Racing Trophies (IRC); and the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series.

 

Competitors are invited to enjoy a barbecue with their families and friends on the deck of Ida Lewis Yacht Club Saturday evening. Put the date on your calendar!

Catapult Goes the Distance

Ida Lewis Distance Race

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 19, 2012) – Ideal sailing conditions, perfect starts and a 16-18 knot southwesterly breeze allowed the 26 boats competing in the 2012 Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR) to power up on Friday, August 17, and provide a great show for the spectators who turned out to see them off on their offshore adventure.  The IRC, PHRF and PHRF Doublehanded fleets were sent on the 122 nautical mile Nomans course, while the two boats racing in the PHRF Cruising Spinnaker class took on the 103 nautical mile Buzzards Tower course.

Weather conditions led to a prediction that the leaders in IRC would be at the finish line off the historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club sometime after sunrise on Saturday morning, where they would receive the traditional champagne welcome.  That prophecy came true for the Ker 40 Catapult owned by Marc Glimcher (New York, N.Y.), which had passed the first mark of the course with about a minute lead on the rest of the IRC fleet and held on to take line honors just before 6:30 a.m. on Saturday morning.

Kattack – Live Feed

Off to an awesome start…

August 16, 2012

Offshore Adventure Beckons

July 2012

 

Roster Grows with Familiar Names and New Entries

 

Photo by Onne van der Wal

 

May 2012

 

Offshore Racing For All Ages

 

Onne van der Wal photo

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Off to an awesome start…

 

 

 

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 17, 2012) – The following are the courses for the various classes:

 

 

 

Class

Division

Course

1

 

IRC

 

C – Nomans-Approx. 122 nm

 

2

 

PHRF

 

C – Nomans-Approx. 122 nm

 

3

 

PHRF Doublehanded

 

C – Nomans-Approx. 122 nm

 

4

 

PHRF Cruising Spinnaker

 

D – Buzzards Bay Tower-Approx. 104 nm

 

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

CONTACT:  Jan Harley, Media Pro, 401-849-0220

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Offshore Adventure Beckons

 

 

 

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 16, 2012) – The historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club was a beehive of activity today as competitors readied for the eighth edition of the Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR) which is set to get underway at 1:00 p.m. on Friday, August 17.  Three starts will dispatch approximately 26 boats ranging from 30-56’ on an overnight adventure that will potentially cover between 104 and 177 nautical miles.  The course, which may be different for each class and which will be determined shortly before the race starts, will take the competitors out of Narragansett Bay before bringing them back for the ILDR’s signature champagne finish between Ida Lewis Yacht Club and the southern tip of Goat Island.

 

Jamestown Yacht Club member Edmund Flynn (Marlboro, Mass.) was enthusiastic about making his fifth consecutive run in the ILDR.  He will sail the Beneteau 40.7 Lark with Tim Brownell (Wickford, R.I.) in the doublehanded class in which he took third place last year. “We’d like to be competitive and we’d like to win the race,” said Flynn.

The feel of winning an IL race cannot be easily explained in words.  Pride becomes your domain name and the victory is evidence of team spirit.  Winning the race is like accomplishing something in spite of the worst difficulties.  It makes one feel as though all the challenges of life are as trivial as insignificant things.  Listen to what another winner says.

“We go out there to have fun. It’s really great because you have the mix; you’ve got the current, you’re in different breeze at different times and you have this strategic challenge towards the end where you have to decide which side to go around Block Island.”

 

Read Full Release…

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race 2012

Friday, August 17, 2012, Newport, RI

Save the DATE!

 

The 2012 edition of the Ida Lewis Distance Race will send competitors on a choice of four coastal race courses (with distances of 104 to 177 nautical miles) that cover some of the most storied and beautiful sailing grounds in the world. With a spectacular start off Fort Adams in Narragansett Bay, the race includes turning marks at Castle Hill, Brenton Reef, Block Island, Montauk Point, Martha’s Vineyard and Buzzards Tower on its way to a signature champagne finish inside Newport Harbor off the historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club.

 

The race’s eighth edition is scheduled for Friday, August 17, 2012, with classes for IRC, PHRF (including Cruising Spinnaker and a Youth Challenge division), One Design and Double-Handed boats of 28 feet or longer. It is a qualifier for the New England Lighthouse Series (PHRF); the Northern and Double-Handed Ocean Racing Trophies (IRC); and the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series.

 

Competitors are invited to enjoy a barbecue with their families and friends on the deck of Ida Lewis Yacht Club Saturday evening. Put the date on your calendar!

Bluewater Technologies, Inc.

1 Washington Street

 

Newport, RI 02840

Let us see the history of sailing races in detail and try to understand its functioning.  Sailing races are said to have originated in the Netherlands in the 17th century.  This resulted in the development of yacht-building businesses in England too.  Races between royal sailing vessels were frequently conducted to entertain the royal family.  In the early 18th century, boats with more speed and fuel efficiency were built for racing purposes.  This increased the thrill of sailing races and more people were attracted towards this.  The yachting association was found in 1875 and races became a widespread phenomenon across world nations.  Browse around here to know full details of the history of a sailing race.

 

In the races, they eventually found that longer boats were faster than shorter ones.  Hence time allowances were given to smaller boats.  Large yacht owners objected to this.  Hence a uniform system of design and ratings were gradually developed for these races.  In the late 1970s, the cruising club of America formulated the standards for racing boats.  Most of the racing boats built during the period were based on this formula only.  Initially, the boats were not so sturdy and lost their balance when the weather was bad.  As a result, there were frequent accidents.  As years passed on, many developments related to lightweight, speed, capacity, etc. were added.  This improved the safety concerns of the contestant and reliability of the boats.  The boats rarely lost their balance during turbulent weather or while moving at a high speed.

During the early 19th-century standard rules were framed clearly for sailing races.  Starting positions were allotted to competitors and buoys were laid in a straight line.  The United Nations popularized this as a favorite sport of public.  Presently there are many types of sailing races like offshore races, ocean classics, inshore races, and around-the-world races.  Few races are conducted with boats specially designed for those races.  The contest can be single-handed or participate as a crew.  Today there is even a world cup contest for sailing races.  The racing boats of today are sturdy to withstand any weather and can move at a high speed.  Also, the rules are also clearly established considering various aspects like safety, ethics and true sportsmanship spirit.  This has certainly set a bright future for sailing races.

Phone: (401) 619-3650

 

FAX: (401) 633-7051

 

SKYPE:  (401) 566-4595

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Beautiful Conditions Highlight Late Season Favorite

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Kirsten Ferguson, Media Pro Int’l, 401.849.0220, kirsten.ferguson@mediapronewport.com

PHRF Class start off Fort Adams in Newport, R.I. (photo credit Onne van der Wal)

ILDR PHRF Class start off Fort Adams in Newport, R.I  – Photo credit Onne van de Wal

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 21, 2011) – This past Saturday morning (August 20), as the sun was barely peaking out from behind the horizon, the Ker 11.3 Oakcliff Racing, with its double-handed crew of Claudia Delahoy and Jeffrey MacFarlane (of Oyster Bay, N.Y.), began its entrance back into Newport Harbor after becoming the first boat to cross the finish line in the 2011 Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR). Delahoy and MacFarlane, who had never sailed together before, mastered the variable wind conditions on the 104 nm Buzzards Tower course, making it back to Newport by 5:44 a.m. after starting on Friday off Forth Adams at 1:05 p.m., with the rest of the 35 boat fleet.

Teamwork and coordination is much required in boat race than any other game.  Joining hands and putting efforts against strong wind and tides is not that easy.  Check my website to know the details of the challenges faced by sailors.  When the weather turns bad during a sail it is something like fighting against nature.

“We didn’t get any sleep the whole time,” said Delahoy, explaining that the winds were much more consistent than originally forecasted, especially for those who took the southern route around Block Island rather than the northern route, which had lighter breeze. “We kept planning that if the wind died off we could take some breaks, but it didn’t and so we didn’t stop pushing. I think that is what got us the lead in the end.” The strategy worked and Oakcliff Racing took home first in the PHRF Double-handed Class, correcting out a little under one hour ahead of Jason Richter’s (Mt. Sinai, N.Y.) J/35 Paladin.

 

Ron O’Hanley’s (Newport, R.I.) Cookson 50 Privateer finished first on corrected time in the IRC Class – consisting of eight boats sailing the Block Island Course (150 nm) – and finished the race in just over 19 hours, earning him the Ida Lewis Distance Race Commodore’s Trophy along with the perpetual Russell L. Hoyt Memorial Trophy for best elapsed time.

 

“We kept the boat going the whole time, and it wasn’t until we headed back into Newport that it started to get light,” said O’Hanley. “We’ve had just about every finish position in this race – second, third, fourth, fifth – but this will be our first year winning our class.”  O’Hanley has sailed in every ILDR but one and found Stephan Frank’s (Darien, Conn.) 69’ custom sloop Gracie and Christopher Culver’s (New York, N.Y.) Swan 42 Blazer, which finished second and third respectively, to be the biggest competition throughout the race.

 

The Custom Sloop 69.5’ Gracie won the Youth Challenge and took second place in the IRC Class. (photo credit Onne van der Wal).Gracie followed Privateer less than an hour behind on corrected time, and 14-year-old Kate Nota (Narragansett, R.I.) took the helm as the boat crossed the finish line. “This was my first offshore racing experience and definitely the highlight of my summer,” said Nota who was accompanied by 11 other youth sailors and four adults, which qualified the team for the Youth Challenge, where more than 40% of the crew must have reached their 14th birthday but not turn 20 prior to the race’s start.  The team not only took home second in the IRC Class but also was presented with the Arent H. Kits van Heyningen Trophy for their youth division performance.

 

In the PHRF Class, the largest class in the fleet with 20 boats, Tristan Mouligne’s (Newport, R.I.) Quest 30 Samba took the top spot winning the Lime Rock Trophy, sailing the Nomans Course (122 nm) in just over 21 hours. “After rounding Sakonnet Point we decided to go offshore to hopefully get some better breeze on our way over to New York and that worked out pretty well,” said Mouligne.  Besides the light lulls coming back into Newport for the finish, Samba experienced fairly steady breeze and was able to beat Bob Manchester’s (Barrington, R.I.) Aerodyne Wazimo and Robert Johnstone’s (Newport, R.I) J/111 Fleetwing, which finished second and third, respectively.

 

“My brother and I did the Bermuda One-Two Yacht Race in June on Samba and we won that as well,” said Mouligne.  “It was really great winning the two big offshore races of the summer.”

 

Steve Clark’s (Warren, R.I.) canting keel ketch Red Herring took home the perpetual Lois J. Muessel Memorial Trophy for best elapsed time in the PHRF Division, while Jeff Rabuffo’s (Middletown, Conn.) Swan 44 Xenophon won the PHRF Cruising Spinnaker Class.

 

Starting Line sponsors for the 2011 Ida Lewis Distance Race were North Sails, New England Boatworks, City of Newport, and Doug Ferguson and Family. Contributing sponsors were Dockwise Yacht Transport, Flint Audio Video, Gosling’s Rum, Mac Designs, Narragansett Beer, Newport Shipyard, Newport Tent Company, Rig Pro Southern Spars, SailorsNightVisionCap.com and Sea Gear Uniforms and Zblok.

 

For more information, go to www.ildistancerace.org or the race’s Facebook Page.

 

More About the Ida Lewis Distance Race

 

The Ida Lewis Yacht Club introduced the Ida Lewis Distance Race in 2004.  Conceived as a biennial event, its next running was 2006, but by then the response from competitors was strong enough that it was clear the race should be held annually in the same popular “late season” time slot of mid- to late August. A Youth Challenge, whereby teams comprised of more than 40% junior sailors qualify for a special trophy, was introduced in 2010 and has been a catalyst for other such youth divisions offered in offshore races. The event, which will enjoy its seventh edition in 2011, is a qualifier for the 2011 New England Lighthouse Series (PHRF); Northern and Double-Handed Ocean Racing Trophies (IRC); and the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series.

 

 

 

(end)

 

 

 

(Top-five Results Follow)

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race

 

Friday, August 20, 2010

 

Top-five Results

 

Place, Yacht Name, Type, Owner/Skipper, Hometown

 

Class 1 – IRC (IRC – 8 Boats)

 

  1. Privateer, Cookson 50, Ron O’Hanley, Newport, R.I.

 

  1. Gracie (Youth), Custom sloop, Stephan Frank, Darien, Conn.

 

  1. Blazer, Swan 42, Christopher Culver, New York, N.Y.

 

  1. Catapult, J/122, Marc Glimcher, New York, N.Y.

 

  1. White Rhino, Swan 56, Todd Stuart, Newport, R.I.

 

 

 

Class 2 – PHRF (PHRF – 20 Boats)

 

  1. Samba, Quest 30, Tristan Mouligne, Newport, R.I.

 

  1. Wazimo, Aerodyne 37.66, Bob Manchester, Barrington, R.I.

 

  1. Fleetwing, J 111, Robert Johnstone, Newport, R.I.

 

  1. Mischief, Lyman-Morse 40, David Schwartz, Smithfield, R.I.

 

  1. COCO, Swan 36, Ian Scott, Newport, R.I.

 

 

 

Class 3 – PHRF – Double-Handed (PHRF – 4 Boats)

 

  1. Oakcliff Racing, Ker 11.3, Jeffrey MacFarlane, Franklin Lakes, N.J.

 

  1. Paladin, J 35, Jason Richter, Mt. Sinai, N.Y.

 

  1. Lark, Beneteau First 40.7, Edmund Flynn, Marlborough, Mass.

 

  1. Wildeyes, Quest 33, Teri & Pete Binkley, Branford, Conn.

 

 

 

Class 4 – PHRF – Cruising Spinnaker (PHRF – 3 Boats)

 

  1. Xenophon, Swan 44 MKII, Jeff Rabuffo , Middletown, Conn.

 

  1. Vixen, S&S Swan 44, John Wayt, Jamestown, R.I.

 

  1. Liberty Call, Hallberg Rassy 44, Matthew Pilon , Middletown, R.I.

Ida Lewis Distance Race 2011

Beautiful Conditions Highlight Late Season Favorite

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 21, 2011) – This past Saturday morning (August 20), as the sun was barely peaking out from behind the horizon, the Ker 11.3 Oakcliff Racing, with its double-handed crew of Claudia Delahoy and Jeffrey MacFarlane (of Oyster Bay, N.Y.), began its entrance back into Newport Harbor after becoming the first boat to cross the finish line in the 2011 Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR).  Delahoy and MacFarlane, who had never sailed together before, mastered the variable wind conditions on the 104 nm Buzzards Tower course, making it back to Newport by 5:44 a.m. after starting on Friday off Forth Adams at 1:05 p.m., with the rest of the 35 boat fleet.

 

Other than wind there are few other factors which determine a good sailing condition.  At times the nature of water is turbulent due to changes in the undersea current.  This will make the sail tough even when the wind is favorable.  Hop over this web-site to know full details.  Now let us listen to the experience of a young sailor.

ILDR PHRF Class start off Fort Adams in Newport, R.I  – Photo credit Onne van de Wal “We didn’t get any sleep the whole time,” said Delahoy, explaining that the winds were much more consistent than originally forecasted, especially for those who took the southern route around Block Island rather than the northern route, which had lighter breeze. “We kept planning that if the wind died off we could take some breaks, but it didn’t and so we didn’t stop pushing. I think that is what got us the lead in the end.” The strategy worked and Oakcliff Racing took home first in the PHRF Double-handed Class, correcting out a little under one hour ahead of Jason Richter’s (Mt. Sinai, N.Y.) J/35 Paladin. Ron O’Hanley’s (Newport, R.I.) Cookson 50 Privateer finished first on corrected time in the IRC Class – consisting of eight boats sailing the Block Island Course (150 nm) – and finished the race in just over 19 hours, earning him the Ida Lewis Distance Race Commodore’s Trophy along with the perpetual Russell L. Hoyt Memorial Trophy for best elapsed time.

 

“We kept the boat going the whole time, and it wasn’t until we headed back into Newport that it started to get light,” said O’Hanley. “We’ve had just about every finish position in this race – second, third, fourth, fifth – but this will be our first year winning our class.”  O’Hanley has sailed in every ILDR but one and found Stephan Frank’s (Darien, Conn.) 69’ custom sloop Gracie and Christopher Culver’s (New York, N.Y.) Swan 42 Blazer, which finished second and third respectively, to be the biggest competition throughout the race.

 

Read More…

 

 

Kattack Link to view race

 

News Releases

August 21 , 2011

 

Beautiful Conditions Highlight Late Season Favorite

 

August 18 , 2011

 

Starting Gun to Fire

 

35 Boats on the Line

 

July 21 , 2011

 

ILDR Countdown to Early Entry Deadline

 

March 28, 2011

 

An Offshore Experience for Youth Sailors and a Challenge for all

 

January, 2011

 

ILDR Announcement

 

Starting Line Sponsors

 

 

New England Boatworks

 

 

North Sails

Doug Ferguson & Family

City of Newport

Contributing Sponsors

 

Dockwise Yacht Transport

 

 

Newport Shipyard

 

 

Rig Pro / Southern Spars

 

 

 

Sea Gear Uniforms

 

 

Flint Audio Video

 

Goslings

 

Narragansett Beer

 

Sailors Night Vision Caps

 

Newport Tent Company

 

Z Blok

 

Mac Designs

Ida Lewis Distance Race 2011

Starting Gun to Fire: 35 Boats on the Line

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 18, 2011) – Tomorrow (Friday, August 19) at 1:00 p.m., the starting gun will fire for three separate starts in the seventh annual Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR), which will see 35 IRC, PHRF and doublehanded boats embark on one of four courses ranging from 104 – 177 nautical miles. With winds forecasted between 10-15 (Friday) and 5-8 knots (Saturday), the Race Committee expects that the smallest boat will finish before 5:00 p.m. on Saturday night (August 20), just in time for a spectacular finish line party at Ida Lewis Yacht Club.

 

“The Ida Lewis Yacht Club is very hospitable to competing racers and this is our one race in the Newport area every year,” said Rick Orichhio (Fairfield, Conn.) who does most of his racing on Long Island Sound and took home third in last year’s IRC Class 1 on his boat J/120 Rocket Science. “I’ve enjoyed the Ida Lewis Distance Race in the past, but 2010 was the first year that we did it on my boat. Our goal is to sail fast and be safe. I’m looking forward to another fun race.”

 

Talk of the Youth Challenge, which started in 2010, has drawn a lot of curious junior sailors, including 15-year-old Hannah Davis (Newport, R.I.) who will be making the jump from her 420 to a high-tech Class 40, Toothface skippered by Mike Dreese (West Newton, Mass.) and crewed by three other experienced sailors. “I’m the youngest crew onboard and was on the boat today checking it out. It is so stripped down for racing,” said Davis who has never raced in an offshore event. “I’m really looking forward to the learning experience and getting good instruction from seasoned sailors. I want to learn as much as possible about offshore racing, because it is not something I’ve been exposed to in the past.”  Read More…

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Countdown to Early Entry Deadline

NEWPORT, R.I. (July 21, 2011) – The Ida Lewis Distance Race (ILDR) is right around the corner, and organizers are encouraging competitors to register by the early bird deadline of August 5 to help build excitement among the competitors and encourage others to sign up early, too. Open to boats 28 feet and longer and with its courses covering some of the most storied and beautiful sailing grounds in the world, the seventh edition of the Ida Lewis Distance Race starts Friday, August 19 at 1 p.m. off Fort Adams in Narragansett Bay and includes turning marks at Castle Hill, Brenton Reef, Block Island, Montauk Point, Martha’s Vineyard and Buzzards Tower on its way to a signature champagne finish inside Newport Harbor off the historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club.

 

Who’s Coming

 

“In the past we’ve done a lot more buoy racing, but after a friend of ours requested we do the Ida Lewis Distance Race back in 2009, we decided to try it out and ended up having a great time,” said John Wayt (Jamestown, R.I.) who placed second in the cruising spinnaker class that year on his S&S Swan 44 Vixen. “We did the race that year with four crew members, including my wife. It was a really relaxing sail but also competitive.”  Read More…

 

 

An Offshore Experience for Youth Sailors and a Challenge for All

NEWPORT, R.I. (March 28, 2011) – This summer, junior sailors will broaden their horizons -literally-as they escape the confines of Narragansett Bay to embark on an offshore adventure covering up to 177 nautical miles.  The Organizing Committee of the Ida Lewis Distance Race introduced its Youth Challenge last year, and it was met with huge success when six boats out of a fleet of 35 signed up to compete.  It will be repeated this year when the seventh edition of the Ida Lewis Distance Race starts Friday, August 19 and sends competitors on a choice of four coastal race courses between 104 nm and 177 nm over some of the most storied and beautiful sailing grounds in the world.

 

Greg Manning’s (Wickford R.I.) team aboard X-41 Sarah won the Youth Challenge and placed third in the PHRF division on 2010. (photo credit to Robbie Benjamin on behalf of the Ida Lewis Distance Race)”The goal of the Youth Challenge is to introduce the junior sailing world to offshore sailing,” said Event Chair Dirk Johnson (Newport, R.I.).  “There is a whole new skill set that is needed to sail in an overnight race, and this is the perfect distance to get juniors onboard and excited without overdoing it.”  Johnson explained that the race attracts family cruisers as well as grand prix racers, offering classes for IRC, PHRF (featuring a cruising spinnaker class as well as the Youth Challenge division), One Design and Double-Handed boats of 28 feet or longer.

 

Read More…

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race · Friday, August 19, 2011

Newport, Rhode Island

Due for its seventh edition in 2011, the Ida Lewis Distance Race is now a classic on New England sailing calendars. The race, which starts Friday, August 19, features a 177nm and a 150nm race course over some of the most storied and beautiful sailing grounds in the world. With a spectacular start off Fort Adams in Narragansett Bay, the race includes turning marks at Castle Hill, Brenton Reef, Block Island, Montauk Point, Martha’s Vineyard and Buzzards Tower on its way to a signature champagne finish inside Newport Harbor off the historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club.

 

Classes are for IRC, PHRF (including Cruising Spinnaker and a Youth Challenge division), One Design and Double-Handed boats of 28 feet or longer. It is a qualifier for the New England Lighthouse Series (PHRF); the Northern and Double-Handed Ocean Racing Trophies (IRC); and the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series.

 

For more information, contact Dirk Johnson, RaceChairman@ildistancerace.org, 401-965-9189, or go to www.ildistancerace.org, where the Notice of Race and online entry will soon be available.

New Youth Challenge Introduces

Juniors to Offshore Sailing

NEWPORT, R.I. (March 4, 2010)–Junior sailors from Narragansett Bay and the surrounding region will be able to extend their summer sailing season this year by 150 miles. The Organizing Committee of the Ida Lewis Distance Race has announced the introduction of its Youth Challenge–aimed specifically at introducing junior sailors to offshore sailing–for this year’s sixth edition of the race, scheduled to start on Friday, August, 20, 2010.

 

Regional yacht clubs and sailing organizations are invited to field youth-crewed teams on the 150 nm mile course that is offered for PHRF classes. (The other course, reserved for IRC classes, is 177 nm.) “The idea of the Ida Lewis Distance Race Youth Challenge is to give junior programs an incentive to organize teams and develop the skills necessary to succeed in a medium-distance overnight race,” said Committee Member Joe Cooper, who is spearheading the effort. “We have already had various teams compete in the race with kids onboard, and we have recognized that because it is a manageable distance – not too long but not too short, either — it lends itself to this.” In 2006, second-place finisher Tom Rich (Middletown, R.I.) said his mostly teenage crew experienced their first-ever overnighter on his Peterson 42 Settler, and they will never forget the whale that sprayed the boat when it spouted, seemingly in encouragement of their efforts.

There are many instances of such wonderful experiences by young sailors.  Once a young sailor shared his struggle in a thunderstorm and how he feared whether the tides will take up the entire boat.  Fortunately, the winds helped and there was a sudden change in the direction of movement of the clouds.  Thus luck helped him address victory.  Back to the details of IL race.

To qualify for the Youth Challenge, more than 50% of the crew must have reached their 14th birthday but not their 19th birthday prior to August 20, 2010. Boats may have junior crew members outside those parameters; however, they will not count towards the youth component. Adults (minimum two aboard, one of whom must be designated as the Captain) will make up the balance of the crew, but it is intended that the adults serve only in a supervisory capacity. Teams must be registered under the flag of a US SAILING yacht club or community sailing establishment. All youth sailors will be required to attend a brief informational meeting the evening prior to the race (participants of all ages welcome), and they will be encouraged to attend one of the Storm Trysail Club Foundation’s Junior Safety at Sea Seminars.

 

“The goal of the Ida Lewis Distance Race Youth Challenge is to introduce junior sailors to the disciplines of seamanship: navigating, night sailing, safety related issues, coordination of larger crews, sail handling and related areas of big boat sailing that are not required in typical dinghy-based programs,” said Cooper.

 

It is anticipated that with sufficient numbers of entries in the Youth Challenge that the fleet will have its own start. Otherwise, the fleet will start within its handicap class. Furthermore, Youth Challenge boats are eligible for overall honors within the PHRF fleet.

 

For information on the Ida Lewis Distance Race Youth Challenge, visit www.ildistancerace.org or contact Youth Challenge Coordinators Joe Cooper, 401-965-6006, Hoodri-sales@att.net, and Andy Dickinson, 401-423-0600, andy@jby.com. There is also a Facebook Page for the Ida Lewis Distance Race. On-line registration is open through August 6.

 

More About the Ida Lewis Distance Race

The Ida Lewis Distance Race, in its sixth running, features a 177 nm “Montauk” course and a 150 nm “Block Island” course over some of the most storied and beautiful sailing grounds in the world. With a spectacular start off Fort Adams in Narragansett Bay, the race includes turning marks at Castle Hill, Brenton Reef, Block Island, Montauk Point, Martha’s Vineyard and Buzzards Tower on its way to a signature champagne finish inside Newport Harbor off the historic Ida Lewis Yacht Club. It attracts family cruisers as well as grand prix racers, offering classes for IRC, PHRF (including Cruising Spinnaker and a new Youth Challenge), One-Design (including NYYC Swan 42) and Double-Handed boats of 28 feet and longer. Hosted by Ida Lewis Yacht Club, it is a qualifier for the 2009 New England Lighthouse Series; Northern and Double-Handed Ocean Racing Trophies; and the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series.

 

For more information, contact Dirk Johnson, info@ildistancerace.org, or go to www.ildistancerace.org for the Notice of Race and online entry (deadline is August 6, 2010).

Shortened Courses Deliver

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Overnight Challenges, Satisfaction

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:  Barby MacGowan, Media Pro Int’l, 401-849-0220, barby.macgowan@mediapronewport.com

Ida Lewis Distance Race

Rambler: George David?s (Hartford, Conn.) 90-foot Rambler won the Ida Lewis Distance Race IRC Division.  Photo:  Amory Ross

Rambler: George David’s (Hartford, Conn.) 90-foot Rambler won the Ida Lewis Distance Race IRC Division.

 

NEWPORT, R.I. (August 22, 2010)—George David (Hartford, Conn.) was shocked at how much wind there was during the sixth annual Ida Lewis Distance Race, even if 17 knots is nothing compared to what his crack crew aboard the 90-foot Rambler has endured before on its many race outings around the world. When Friday’s (August 20) 1p.m. start had to be delayed an hour due to a dying gradient wind, David wasn’t hopeful that the shortened 122-nm course set for his IRC class would offer much in the way of thrilling winds, but Rambler wound up averaging an impressive 10 ½ knots of speed throughout 12-plus hours of racing, finishing at 2:18 the next morning and correcting out two hours ahead of Ron O’Hanley’s (Boston, Mass.) Privateer.

 

“We put ourselves in the right places most of the time,” said David, explaining that wind in the teens appeared mostly between turning marks at Montauk and Noman’s Land, and the rest of the legs had navigator Matt Wachowicz and tactician Peter Isler collaborating doggedly on weather transitions, avoiding light spots and determining whether going north of Block Island rather than south had its benefits.  Turns out it did—Rambler and a few others in the 36-boat fleet that chose that route gained considerably—and for its spot-on decisions Rambler received the event’s Navigator’s Award in addition to trophies for best elapsed and best corrected time in the five-boat IRC class.

 

Shindig: Arthur Burke (Dartmouth, Mass.) at the helm of the Shindig, winner in PHRF Division 1 at the Ida Lewis Distance Race.  Photo:  Amory Ross

Arthur Burke’s (Dartmouth, Mass.) Andrews 70 Shindig also took home three trophies, one each for best corrected and elapsed time in PHRF Division 1–in which 11 boats sailed–and one for overall best corrected time in PHRF (a second division hosted 12 boats).  Organizers chose a 104-nm course for PHRF and Double-handed boats to sail, and Shindig made it home in just under 15 and ½ hours, with Robert MacMillan’s Class 40 Cutlass taking second, behind by just over nine minutes on corrected time.

 

Shindig: Arthur Burke (Dartmouth, Mass.) at the

 

helm of Shindig, winner in PHRF Division 1 at

 

the Ida Lewis Distance Race  Photo:  Amory Ross

 

“Like everyone else, we were searching for wind,” said Burke, who literally drifted right after the PHRF start, which was combined for both classes.  “But when we found it, then we really started to move.”  Burke said his crew, which has countless Newport to Bermuda races under their belts, changed sails 17 times during the race and the boat was becalmed at multiple times during the race.  “We just kept pressing.”

Wind can work either way for the contestants.  A too rough wind will make sailing a tougher job.  On the other hand, when there is no wind, sailing is not possible as speedy sailing depends on wind direction and power.  Click this important link to know full details about boat races.  Back to the details of IL race.

Within the PHRF division there were six Youth Challenge teams that proved the concept’s inaugural push was a popular one that will have legs for the future.  Teams comprised of at least 40 percent junior sailors between the ages of 14 and 18 qualified and sailed in the PHRF Division–scored as such but then also scored separately for the new Arent H. Kits van Heyningen Trophy provided by Finish Line sponsor KVH Industries.  To present the trophy at Ida Lewis Yacht Club on Saturday night was Mr. Kits van Heyningen himself, who at age 94, competed in the event and remains an inspiration to all sailing generations.  The proud recipient was the crew aboard the X-41 Sarah, owned by Greg Manning (Warwick, R.I.) and representing East Greenwich Yacht Club, which also finished third in PHRF Division 1.  The top Youth finisher in Division 2 was Tom Rich’s (Middletown, R.I.) second-place finisher Settler.

ActOne:  Act One (on left), a Summit 35 skippered by Bill Titus (Newport, R.I.) and representing Ida Lewis Yacht Club, was one of six Youth Challenge entries in the Ida Lewis Distance Race. To qualify for the Youth Challenge, 40% of a crew had to be junior sailors between the ages of 14 and 18; Act One?s were from junior sailing programs in Newport and Nantucket.  Photo:  Amory Ross

 

Act One (on left), a Summit 35 skippered by

 

Bill Titus (Newport, R.I.) and representing

 

Ida Lewis Yacht Club, was one of six

 

Youth Challenge entries in the

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race.

 

To qualify for the Youth Challenge,

 

40% of a crew had to be junior sailors

 

between the ages of 14 and 18;

 

Act One’s were from junior

 

sailing programs in Newport and Nantucket.

 

Photo:  Amory Ross

 

In the Doublehanded Class, sailing under PHRF, Michael Hennessy’s (New York, N.Y.) Class 40 Dragon took top spot, sailing the course in just under 19 and ½ hours, while Teri and Pete Binkley’s (Branford, Conn.) Quest 33 Wildeyes finished in just under 24 hours for second.  Frank Atkinson’s (Coconut Grove, Fla.) Cape Bay Fast 40 Different Drummer won PHRF Division 2.

 

The Ida Lewis Distance Race is the only distance race that starts and finishes in Newport, R.I. It features a signature champagne finish inside Newport Harbor and was named one of Sailing World magazine’s “14 great events” in its guide for “The Ultimate Summer.”  It is also a qualifier for the 2010 New England Lighthouse Series; Northern and Double-Handed Ocean Racing Trophies; and the US-IRC Gulf Stream Series.

 

For the first time ever, fans were able to follow real-time race tracking through Kattack LIVE.

 

KVH Industries (which made possible the tracking and the new trophy for the Youth Challenge) was the lead Finish Line Sponsor while ATC Tech joined veteran Starting Line sponsors North Sails and New England Boatworks. Contributing sponsors were Dockwise Yacht Transport, Gosling’s Rum, Mac Designs, Narragansett Beer, Newport Shipyard, Newport Tent Company, Rig Pro Southern Spars, Sea Gear Uniforms, and Z Blok.

 

 

 

For more information, including full results, visit www.ildistancerace.org, visit its Facebook Page or contact info@ildistancerace.org.

 

 

 

(end)

 

(Top-five Results Follow)

 

 

 

 

 

Ida Lewis Distance Race

 

Friday, August 20, 2010

 

Top-five Results

 

 

 

Place, Yacht Name, Type, Owner/Skipper, Hometown, Results, Total Points

 

 

 

Class 1 – IRC (IRC – 5 Boats)

 

  1. Rambler, RP 90 W B 90, George David, Hartford, Conn.

 

  1. Privateer, Cookson 50 50, Ron O’Hanley, Boston, Mass.

 

  1. Rocket Science, J 120 40, Rick Oricchio, Fairfield, Conn.

 

  1. Barleycorn, NYYC Swan 42 42.5, Brendan Brownyard, Bay Shore, N.Y.

 

  1. Fearless, Farr 395 39.4, Shaun Ensor, East Haven, Conn.

 

 

 

Class 2 – PHRF Division 1 (PHRF – 11 Boats)

 

  1. Shindig, Andrews 70, Arthur Burke, Dartmouth, Mass.

 

  1. Cutlass, Class 40, Robert MacMillan, Newport, R.I.

 

  1. Sarah (Youth), X-41, Greg Manning, Warwick, R.I.

 

  1. Eagle, J 120, Steven Levy, Greenwich, Conn.

 

  1. Toothface, Akilaria Class 40, Mike Dreese, West Newton, Mass.

 

 

 

Class 2 – PHRF Division 2 (PHRF – 12 Boats)

 

  1. Different Drummer, Cape Bay Fast 40 39.6, Frank Atkinson, Coconut Grove, Fla.

 

  1. Settler (Youth), Peterson 42, Tom Rich, Middletown, R.I.

 

  1. Act One (Youth), Summit 35, Bill Titus, Newport, R.I.

 

  1. Lark, Beneteau First 40.7, Edmund Flynn, Marlborough, Mass.

 

  1. Coco, Swan 36, Ian Scott, Newport, R.I.

 

 

 

Class 3 – PHRF – Double-Handed (PHRF – 8 Boats)

 

  1. Dragon, Class 40, Michael Hennessy, New York, N.Y.

 

  1. Wildeyes, Quest 33′, Teri & Pete Binkley, Branford, Conn.

 

  1. Samba, Quest 30, Tristan Mouligne, Boston, Mass.

 

  1. Dark ‘n Stormy, J 105, Michael Lachance, Wolcott, Conn.

 

  1. Paladin, J 35, Jason Richter, Mt Sinai, N.Y.